• Foundations of Truth

Learning from the Pandemic Lifestyle

Updated: Jul 3



As people emerge from the restrictions of the pandemic, they are learning from the experience. What worked, what could have been done differently, what was good for families. Let's take a look at what families desire to keep, going forward, from the lock-down lifestyle.


Parents were stretched to their furthest during the pandemic like no other time in recent history. They wore hats that some had never worn before. They became teachers, social directors, tech support, spiritual confidants, mental health counselors, and more. Exhausting and challenging, to say the least.


What did families embrace in the last year? What did they learn about their relationships, their

schedules, and survival?


A recent article in Christianity Today revealed answers from interviewed mothers. Some take-aways that will endure post-pandemic included: mealtimes together; family devotions; taking time outdoors and enjoying books together.[1] A sense of purpose that was not there before in the frantic schedule of sports, church and school functions, and demands of job commutes. A slow down and pay attention mindset and sense of gratitude were reborn in many families.

Mother's found that self-care became necessary for mental health and physical stamina. "Self-care isn’t just a nap or a hot bath to escape the family. It’s about setting priorities, setting boundaries, and finding purpose."[2]Self-care habits are part of what was learned and worth keeping.


What families learned about health will continue. The basics of washing hands and covering coughs, attention to mental health, and the balance and intention of daily activities.


Were there spiritual lessons learned during the past year?


Rajan Zed in his Faith Forum relates two sides of the spiritual reaction of the pandemic. "Many will list the lessons learned from COVID-19 as the need to embrace spirituality; that faith can be expressed in nontraditional ways; that faith provides comfort, hope, reassurance, a sense of security and solace during a crisis”[3] There were others who questioned why God would allow such a worldwide event that took so many lives. They wondered if God were absent or cared.


Confusion reigned King during the last fifteen months. Truth became elusive. Life was negotiated through muddy waters. If you have learned anything good, keep it. If you have hurt and experienced loss, let God comfort you. The truth of Philippians 3:12-14 encourages us to move with the intentional actions that God calls us to embody "Not that I have already obtained this or am already perfect, but I press on to make it my own because Christ Jesus has made me his own. Brothers, I do not consider that I have made it my own. But one thing I do: forgetting what lies behind and straining forward to what lies ahead, I press toward the goal for the prize of the upward call of God in Christ Jesus." (ESV)


In Christ, we remain.


Foundations of Truth hereby waives all claim of copyright (economic and moral) in this work and immediately places it in the public domain; it may be used, published, edited, and distributed in any manner whatsoever without any attribution or notice to Foundations of Truth.

[1] https://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2021/may-web-only/moms-wont-miss-pandemic-quarantine-habits-mothers-day.html [2] https://www.irishtimes.com/life-and-style/health-family/five-habits-learned-during-the-pandemic-that-we-should-keep-1.4457310 [3] https://www.rgj.com/story/life/2021/05/13/what-has-covid-19-taught-us-faith-forum/5080412001/

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